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Euripides and the poetics of sorrow art, gender, and commemoration in Alcestis, Hippolytus, and Hecuba by Charles Segal

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Published by Duke University Press in Durham, N.C .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Euripides -- Criticism and interpretation.,
  • Hippolytus (Greek mythology) in literature.,
  • Hecuba (Legendary character) in literature.,
  • Alcestis (Greek mythology) in literature.,
  • Trojan War -- Literature and the war.,
  • Sex role in literature.,
  • Grief in literature.,
  • Tragedy.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. [283]-301) and index.

StatementCharles Segal.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsPA3978 .S5 1993
The Physical Object
Paginationxiii, 317 p. :
Number of Pages317
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL1407186M
ISBN 10082231360X
LC Control Number93015565

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  Euripides and the Poetics of Sorrow: Art, Gender, and Commemoration in Alcestis, Hippolytus, and Hecuba Hardcover – Octo by Charles Segal (Author) › Visit Amazon's Charles Segal Page. Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Cited by: This question, how suffering and sorrow become the stuff of aesthetic delight, is at the center of Charles Segal's new book, which collects and expands his recent explorations of Euripides' art. Alcestis, Hippolytus, and Hecuba, the three early plays interpreted here, are linked by common themes of violence, death, lamentation and mourning, and Cited by: In place of the epic muse of martial glory, Euripides, Segal argues, evokes a muse of sorrows who transforms the suffering of individuals into a "common grief for all the citizens," a community of Author: Charles Segal. In place of the epic muse of martial glory, Euripides, Segal argues, evokes a muse of sorrows who transforms the suffering of individuals into a "common grief for all the citizens," a community of shared feeling in the theater.

  This question, how suffering and sorrow become the stuff of aesthetic delight, is at the center of Charles Segal's new book, which collects and expands his recent explorations of Euripides' art. Alcestis, Hippolytus, and Hecuba, the three early plays interpreted here, are linked by common themes of violence, death, lamentation and mourning Cited by: Euripides and the Poetics of Sorrow Art, Gender, Share. Book Pages: Illustrations: Published: October Author: Charles Segal. Subjects Gender and Sexuality, Literature and Literary Studies > Literary Criticism, Pre-Modern Studies > Classical Studies Author: Charles Segal. In place of the epic muse of martial glory, Euripides, Segal argues, evokes a muse of sorrows who transforms the suffering of individuals into a "common grief for all the citizens," a community of. Euripides and the Poetics of Sorrow: Art, Gender, and Commemoration in Alcestis, Hippolytus, and Hecuba. By Segal. Charles Segal Charles Segal is Professor of Greek and Latin at Harvard University. He is the author of numerous books, including Lucretius on Death and Anxiety, Orpheus: The Myth of the Poet, and I nterpreting Greek Tragedy.

In place of the epic muse of martial glory, Euripides, Segal argues, evokes a muse of sorrows who transforms the suffering of individuals into a "common grief for all the citizens," a community of shared feeling in the : Duke University Press. In place of the epic muse of martial glory, Euripides, Segal argues, evokes a muse of sorrows who transforms the suffering of individuals into a "common grief for all the citizens," a community of shared feeling in the by: This question, how suffering and sorrow become the stuff of aesthetic delight, is at the center of Charles Segal's new book, which collects and expands his recent explorations of Euripides' art. "Alcestis, Hippolytus," and "Hecuba," the three early plays interpreted here, are linked by common themes of violence, death, lamentation and mourning. This book explores how Euripides’ poetic imagination shaped his vision of tragedy in three plays: Alcestis, Hippolytus, and Hecuba. The first two have long been recognized as masterpieces of Greek drama and remain among the most discussed works of Greek literature.